crampton

David Crampton, PhD

Associate Professor


Ph.D. in Social Work and Political Science, University of Michigan
M.S.W., University of Michigan
M.P.P., University of Michigan
B.A., Oberlin College

Google Scholar Citation Page

Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations

Room 213
Case Western Reserve University
11402 Bellflower Court
Cleveland, Ohio 44106

david.crampton@case.edu
216-368-6680

About

David S. Crampton is an Associate Professor of Social Work at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University. His research interests focus on the evaluation of family centered and community-based child welfare practices, with the ultimate goal of protecting vulnerable children through the engagement of families, communities and social service providers. Member of a national team evaluating the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Family to Family Initiative.
Read full biographical sketch.

Course List

  • SPPP 529 Child and Family Policy and Service Delivery
  • SASS 534 Community and Social Development Perspectives


Crampton, D., & Riley-Behringer, M. (2012).  What works in family support services?  In P. Curtis, P. & G. Alexander, (Eds). What Works in Child Welfare? (pp. 81-92 ). Washington, DC:Child Welfare League of America.

Crampton, D. S. (2011). Family group decision making. In R. J. R. Levesque (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Adolescence (pp. 930-936). New York, NY: Springer.

Crampton, D. S., & Coulton, C. J. (2011). The benefits of life table analysis for describing disproportionality. In D. Green, K. Belanger, R. McRoy, & L. Bullard (Eds.) Challenging racial disproportionality in child welfare: Research, policy and practice (pp. 45–52). Arlington, VA: CWLA Press.

Crampton, D. S., Usher, C., Wildfire, J., Webster, D., & Cuccaro-Alamin, S. (2011). Does community and family engagement enhance permanency for children in foster care?  Findings from an evaluation of the family to family initiative. Child Welfare, 90(4), 61-77.

Crea, T. M., & Crampton, D. S. (2011). The context of program implementation and evaluation: A pilot study of interorganizational differences to improve child welfare reform efforts. Children and Youth Services Review, 33, 2273-2281.

Crea, T. M., Crampton, D. S., Knight, N., & Paine-Wells, L. (2011). Organizational factors and the implementation of family to family: Contextual elements of systems reform. Child Welfare, 90(2), 143–161.

Pennell, J., & Crampton, D. S. (2011). Parents and child maltreatment: Integrating strategies. In J. W. White, M. P. Koss, & A. E. Kazdin (Eds.), Violence against women and children: Consensus, critical analyses, and emergent priorities (Vol. 2 Navigating solutions, pp.27–45). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Crampton, D., & Rideout, P. (2010). Restorative justice and child welfare: Engaging families and communities in the care and protection of children. In E. Beck, N. Kropf, & P. Leonard (Eds.), Social Work and Restorative Justice: Skills for Dialogue, Peacemaking, and Reconciliation (pp.175–194). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Wildfire, J., Rideout, P., & Crampton, D. (2010). Transforming child welfare, One Team Decisionmaking meeting at a time. Protecting Children, 25(2), 40–50.

Crampton, D., & Pennell, J. (2009). Family-involvement meetings with older children in foster care: Intuitive appeal, promising practices and the challenge of child welfare reform. In B. Kerman, M. Freundlich, & A. N. Maluccio (Eds.), Achieving permanence for older children and youth in foster care (pp. 266–290). New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Piccola, T. D., & Crampton, D. (2009). Differences in foster care utilization among non-urban counties. Journal of Public Child Welfare, 3, 235–253.

Shlonsky, A., Schumaker, K., Cook, C., Crampton, D., Saini, M., Backe-Hansen, E. & Kowalski, K. (2009). Family Group Decision Making for children at risk of abuse and neglect [Protocol]. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 3 (Art. No.: CD007984).


In the News


Join Us and Our Presenters at CSWE 2016 APM

Oct 28 2016

cswe-2016-name-snipThere are a variety of ways you can join the Mandel School at the Council on Social Work Education 61st Annual Program Meeting (#APM16), the premiere conference for social work educators and professionals on November 3-6, 2016, in Atlanta, Georgia.

+ Visit us at booth #504. We have special Centennial gift for attendees, copies of our just-released 2015-2016 Research Annual Report, and lots of great information for our alumni, colleagues, and prospective students.

+ Join us at a private reception for Mandel School alumni, faculty and students to celebrate our Centennial and another record year of research. It is on Friday, November 4, at 5pm at Cuts Steakhouse. Click here for complete details and to RSVP.

+ Join Dr. Terry Hokenstad, Distinguished University Professor and the Ralph S. and Dorothy P. Schmitt Professor, at the 10th Annual Hokenstad International Lecture on Saturday, November 5, at 8:45 a.m. in the Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel Ballroom Salon B. Darja Zaviršek of the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia was selected as the lecturer and she will present “The Humanitarian Crisis of Migration: Current Dimensions and Challenges for Social Work Practice.”

+ Three Mandel School faculty members are being recognized and honored as mentors through the CSWE Council on the Role and Status of Women in Social Work Education Mentor Recognition Program, which honors mentors who have made a difference. They will be acknowledged at the Networking Breakfast on Saturday, November 5, and on the CSWE website. They are:

+ Presentations at CSWE 2016 APM by Mandel School faculty, students, and research staff:

  • Collins, C. C., Bai, R. & Crampton, D. Evaluating the implementation of Partnering for Family Success. Interactive poster.
  • Healy, L., & Hokenstad, M.C. et al. Promoting and teaching the 2030 agenda and sustainable development goals of the United Nations. Invited partnership presentation.
  • Hokenstad, M.C. et al. Realizing the Vision of the Kendall Institute Through International Education Collaborations. Invited partnership presentation.
  • Holmes, M. R. The Flipped Classroom: Promoting engaged learning in direct practice methods. Oral paper presentation.
  • Hoy, J., Vincent, A., Buck, W.P., & Strand, E. Humans and animals: An emerging and promising collaborative practice. Interactive workshop.
  • Kobulsky, J., Holmes, M.R., & Yoon, S. Physical abuse safety concerns and substance use among child welfare adolescents. Oral paper presentation.
  • Kobulsky, J.M. Internalizing pathways to early substance use in child welfare-involved youthOral paper presentation.
  • Lee, E., & Santiago, A. M. The effects of cumulative risk and protective factors on adolescent substance use. Oral paper presentation.
  • Riley-Behringer, M., & Cage, J. Building Students’ Duty-to-Warn/Duty-to-Protect Skills Through Case Study and Team Collaboration. Interactive workshop.
  • Sawyer, L.N. Enhancing student soft-skill development in online education course rooms and communities. Interactive workshop.
  • Wood, Z.B. & Edguer, M.  Triangulating the Assessment of Holistic Social Work Competence: Challenges and Opportunities. Invited Roundtable, CSWE Assessment Institute.

American Evaluation Association’s 2016 conference

Oct 27 2016

evalutaion-2016Poverty Center researchers Dr. Robert Fischer and Dr. Elizabeth Anthony will be presenting at the American Evaluation Association’s 2016 conference on October 28 and 29, 2016.

Rob Fischer, co-director of the Poverty Center, is presenting on “Evaluating Social Impact Financing in Human Services” on October 28th at 4:30PM as part of the Critical Meta-Evaluation of Social Return on Investment (SROI): Evaluator, Economist, and Accountant Perspectives on Evaluation Design panel. The presentation is on how local governments often lack the resources to invest in innovative models to address key community needs. So-called “Social Impact Bonds” offer a mechanism for attracting private sector funding for initiatives that are targeted to complex and high-cost social conditions. In 2013, Cuyahoga County became the first U.S. county to launch a social impact bond under the name Pay For Success. This initiative involves an intensive approach to keep homeless families together and to reduce foster care costs. This paper provides an overview of how social impact financing works and what the experience with them has been thus far. The presentation describes the development and evaluation of the initiative in Cuyahoga County focused on homeless families with children involved in child welfare. The paper explores the implications of these funding models for the evaluation of nonprofits that carry out innovative services. Beth Anthony along with Poverty Center associate director David Crampton and co-director Claudia Coulton co-authored this report.

On October 29th at 10:45am, faculty associate Beth Anthony  will present “Compared to what? Exploring the value of an RCT in interpreting program delivery in a home visiting context” as part of the panel Randomized Controlled Trials in Social Services and Education. This session highlights the value of comparative methodologies in the evaluation of human services programs. Given the realities of under-staffed, under-resourced social service agencies, program evaluators are often unable to implement a rigorously designed evaluation, settling instead for single group pre-test, post-test comparisons. We present the results and challenges of a longitudinal, randomized field experiment to test the effectiveness of a stress-reduction curriculum embedded in an existing home visiting program for low-income mothers. In light of high attrition and null findings even among a subgroup of women who completed the intervention, the evaluators reflect on the methods to judge the efficacy of home visiting as a model of service delivery. Rob Fischer is also an author on this presentation.

To know more visit the official conference website at American Evaluation Association’s 2016 conference.


Research ShowCASE on April 15th Features Mandel School

Apr 15 2016

Research ShowCASEOn April 15, hundreds of researchers, scientists and scholars will gather in Case Western Reserve’s Veale Convocation Center for the annual Research ShowCASE, a day filled with exploration and discovery of the university’s exciting research. Check out the full list of Mandel School presenters below, including many faculty members, students and researchers

Faculty (highlighted), Research Staff, and Doctoral Students (bold):

1. Cyleste Collins, Rong Bai, David Crampton, Rob Fischer: “Partnering for Family Success Process Evaluation”

2. Dalhee Yoon, Paul Tuschman, Mark, I. Singer, Margaret Baughman-Sladky, Michael C. Gearhart: “Case Study: Staff Perspectives on the use of Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) in Drug Courts Serving Opioid-Addicted Clients”

3. Dalhee Yoon, David S. Crampton, Susan Yoon, Sarah K. Bearman: “Assessing the Impact of Family Participation on Team Decisionmaking”

4. David Crampton, Claudia Coulton, Francisca Garcia-Cobian Richter, Rob Fischer: “Integrated Data System Analysis for the Design of a Pay-for-Success Intervention in Foster Care”

5. Aviva Vincent, David L. Hussey, Michelle Riske-Morris: “Reversing the Pipeline: Examining the Need for Transition Planning from Prison to the Community”

6. Michael C. Gearhart, Daniel J. Flannery, Mark I. Singer, Jeff Kretschmar, Fred Butcher: “Predictors of Functioning in a Juvenile Justice Diversion Program: ADHD, Mental Health, and Trauma”

7. Robert Fischer, Elizabeth Anthony, Nina Lalich, Marci Blue, Tsui Chan: “Childhood Lead Exposure in the City of Cleveland: Why Point-in-Time Estimates Aren’t Enough”

8. Seungjong Cho, Sun Kyung Kim: “Adjustment Problems of Female Spouses of International Students: Theoretical Frameworks” (Oral Presentation)

9. Weidi Qin: “Patterns of Diabetes Among Asian Americans”

Undergraduate Students (Research Advisor: Sharon Milligan):

1. Chelsea Smith: “The Causes and Treatments for Eating Disorders: A literature Review”

2. Amy Wang: “The relationship between socioeconomic status and other demographic factors and dental health behavior”

3. Feifei Deng: “Oral Health and Its Impact on General Health: A Literature Review of Society’s Response”

4. Isabelle Haney: “Mental Health Prevalence, Stigma, and Resources among College Students”

5. Amarinder Syan: “The Impact of Food Deserts on Food Insecurity in the United States”

Undergraduate Students (Research Advisor: Megan Holmes):

1. Michaela Epperson: “Beliefs, Resiliency, and Experiences with Intimate Partner Violence”

Undergraduate Students (Research Advisor: Debra R. Hrouda):

1. Debra Hrouda, Jennifer Collins-Lakner, Christopher Mayer, Megan Mathur: “Identifying the Critical Ingredients of an Evidence-Based Practice: Seeking Expert Opinions”

MSSA Students (Research Advisor: Debra R. Hrouda):

1. Debra Hrouda, Jennifer Collins-Lakner, Christopher Mayer, Megan Mathur:

“Identifying the Critical Ingredients of an Evidence-Based Practice: A Targeted Literature Review”