David Crampton, PhD

Associate Professor


Ph.D. in Social Work and Political Science, University of Michigan
M.S.W., University of Michigan
M.P.P., University of Michigan
B.A., Oberlin College

Google Scholar Citation Page

Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations

Room 213
Case Western Reserve University
11402 Bellflower Court
Cleveland, Ohio 44106

david.crampton@case.edu
216-368-6680

About

David S. Crampton is an Associate Professor of Social Work at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University. His research interests focus on the evaluation of family centered and community-based child welfare practices, with the ultimate goal of protecting vulnerable children through the engagement of families, communities and social service providers. Member of a national team evaluating the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Family to Family Initiative.
Read full biographical sketch.

Course List

  • SPPP 529 Child and Family Policy and Service Delivery
  • SASS 534 Community and Social Development Perspectives


Crampton, D., & Riley-Behringer, M. (2012).  What works in family support services?  In P. Curtis, P. & G. Alexander, (Eds). What Works in Child Welfare? (pp. 81-92 ). Washington, DC:Child Welfare League of America.

Crampton, D. S. (2011). Family group decision making. In R. J. R. Levesque (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Adolescence (pp. 930-936). New York, NY: Springer.

Crampton, D. S., & Coulton, C. J. (2011). The benefits of life table analysis for describing disproportionality. In D. Green, K. Belanger, R. McRoy, & L. Bullard (Eds.) Challenging racial disproportionality in child welfare: Research, policy and practice (pp. 45–52). Arlington, VA: CWLA Press.

Crampton, D. S., Usher, C., Wildfire, J., Webster, D., & Cuccaro-Alamin, S. (2011). Does community and family engagement enhance permanency for children in foster care?  Findings from an evaluation of the family to family initiative. Child Welfare, 90(4), 61-77.

Crea, T. M., & Crampton, D. S. (2011). The context of program implementation and evaluation: A pilot study of interorganizational differences to improve child welfare reform efforts. Children and Youth Services Review, 33, 2273-2281.

Crea, T. M., Crampton, D. S., Knight, N., & Paine-Wells, L. (2011). Organizational factors and the implementation of family to family: Contextual elements of systems reform. Child Welfare, 90(2), 143–161.

Pennell, J., & Crampton, D. S. (2011). Parents and child maltreatment: Integrating strategies. In J. W. White, M. P. Koss, & A. E. Kazdin (Eds.), Violence against women and children: Consensus, critical analyses, and emergent priorities (Vol. 2 Navigating solutions, pp.27–45). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Crampton, D., & Rideout, P. (2010). Restorative justice and child welfare: Engaging families and communities in the care and protection of children. In E. Beck, N. Kropf, & P. Leonard (Eds.), Social Work and Restorative Justice: Skills for Dialogue, Peacemaking, and Reconciliation (pp.175–194). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Wildfire, J., Rideout, P., & Crampton, D. (2010). Transforming child welfare, One Team Decisionmaking meeting at a time. Protecting Children, 25(2), 40–50.

Crampton, D., & Pennell, J. (2009). Family-involvement meetings with older children in foster care: Intuitive appeal, promising practices and the challenge of child welfare reform. In B. Kerman, M. Freundlich, & A. N. Maluccio (Eds.), Achieving permanence for older children and youth in foster care (pp. 266–290). New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Piccola, T. D., & Crampton, D. (2009). Differences in foster care utilization among non-urban counties. Journal of Public Child Welfare, 3, 235–253.

Shlonsky, A., Schumaker, K., Cook, C., Crampton, D., Saini, M., Backe-Hansen, E. & Kowalski, K. (2009). Family Group Decision Making for children at risk of abuse and neglect [Protocol]. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 3 (Art. No.: CD007984).


In the News


New Report on Cuyahoga Partnering for Family Success Process Evaluation

Jul 27 2017

The Poverty Center has released its first Briefly Stated report of the year on the process evaluation of the first two years of Partnering for Family Success (PFS), a five-year randomized control study underway in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The program is a partnership between FrontLine Service, Cuyahoga County Division of Children and Family Services, Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services, Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority, the Domestic Violence and Child Advocacy Center, and Enterprise Community Partners, Inc.

Using the evidence-based Critical Time Intervention framework, and focusing on homeless caregivers with children in out-of-home placement (OHP), the PFS program seeks to safely reduce the number of days that children spend in OHP. The overall program goal is to safely reunite families quickly by providing families with housing, and offering supportive services, using avoided foster care costs to serve families more effectively. Data from multiple sources indicated that the PFS program helps to stabilize families in the treatment group through providing housing and increased levels of public assistance. Treatment group families also show less involvement with child welfare and decrease their contacts with case management services over time. However, clients’ experiences with domestic violence and service coordination across agencies were identified as important challenges.

Download the Briefly Stated report.

The report was authored by Rong Bai, MSSA, MNO, Cyleste C. Collins, Ph.D., David Crampton, Ph.D., Chun Liu, MSSA and Rob Fischer, Ph.D.

The report’s authors appreciate the assistance of Brianna Andrie who conducted two of the interviews. Dana Santo of FrontLine Service, and Karen Anderson at DCFS helped to arrange the interviews. Poverty Center researchers Tsui Chan, Marci Blue, and Nina Lalich assisted with and/or conducted the analyses.


Poverty Center at the 2017 Society for Social Work and Research Conference

Jan 9 2017

Several faculty and students from the Center of Urban Poverty and Community Development will be attending and presenting at the 21st annual conference of the Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR) in New Orleans this week.

Dr. Claudia Coulton, co-director, and Dr. David Crampton, associate director, will be participating in the round table discussion Advancing the Impact of Ecologically Oriented Research on Child Maltreatment Prevention on Friday, January 13.

Recent Poverty Center faculty associate Dr. Cyleste Collins presents Bridging the Gap Between Researchers and “Regular People:” Building Research Capacity in Community Organizations on Friday as well.

Rong Bai, a doctoral student research assistant at the Center, is the presenting author on the ePoster Evaluating the Implementation of Partnering for Family Success on Saturday, January 14. The other authors on the poster are Dr. Collins, Dr. Crampton, and Center co-director Dr. Robert Fischer.

Also on Saturday, Dr. Coulton is presenting Temporal Effects of Distressed Housing on Child Maltreatment Among Young Children; Poverty Center doctoral assistant Youngmin Cho, faculty associate Dr. Francisca Richter, and Dr. Fischer are also authors.

2007 research by Dr. Coulton and others from the Center is being cited in another child maltreatment panel presented by faculty from the University of Southern California and New Mexico State University on Friday.


2017 SSWR: Faculty and Student Presenters

Jan 4 2017

The Mandel School is proud to be participating in the Society for Social Work Research’s 21st Annual Conference, on January 11-15, 2017, in New Orleans. In addition to having a booth at the conference (#102), one of our faculty members, Claudia Coulton, PhD, was chosen as a 2017 SSWR Fellow and will be presenting at the conference among many other Mandel School faculty members and doctoral students. Download the flyer for the complete schedule of presenters: 2017 SSWR Presenters Flyer

Presentations:

Claudia Coulton, PhD & David Crampton, PhD: Advancing the Impact of Ecologically Oriented Research on Child Maltreatment Prevention.

Claudia Coulton, PhD: Temporal Effects of Distressed Housing on Child Maltreatment Among Young Children.

Kathleen Farkas, PhD: Criminologic risk levels of justice involved people with serious mental illness.

Megan Holmes, PhD: Physical Abuse Safety Concerns and Substance use Among Child Welfare Adolescents, Navigating the Academic Job Market, & Promoting Resilient Academic Competence in Maltreated Children.

Jeffrey Kretschmar, PhD & F. Butcher: Promoting Resilience in Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth with Behavioral Health and Trauma Concerns.

Meeyoung Min, PhD, Sonia Minnes, Phd, & J.Y. Kim (PhD Student): Gender variation of individual assets and problem behaviors in at-risk adolescents: A longitudinal cross-lagged analysis.

Dana Prince, PhD: Longitudinal Relationship Between Future Orientation, Substance Use and Delinquency Among African American and Latino Young Men, Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Adolescents in Foster Care: The Impact of Sexual Orientation, & Factors Influencing Homelessness Among Youth Aging out of Foster Care, and The Relation of Homelessness to Other Well-being Outcomes: Findings from the National youth in Transitions Database.

Elizabeth Tracy, PhD & S. Brown (PhD Student): Differential Effects of maternal and Parental Warmth on Adult Recovery Support and Personal network Characteristics Among Women in Substance Abuse Treatment.

Laura Voith, Phd: neighborhood Predictors of Intimate Partner Violence: A Theory-Informed Analysis using Hierarchical Linear Modeling.

J. Cage (PhD Student): Comparing the Odds of High School Level Completion of Maltreated Youth in Out-of-Home Placement to Maltreated Youth in their Biological homes.

Michael Gearhart (PhD Student): Mutual Efficacy and Collective Efficacy: Preventing Neighborhood Disorder.

W. Kim & D. Yoon (PhD Students): The role of fathers in maltreatment: Differential effects on maltreatment type. Mental Health Mechanisms Linking Fathers to Child Outcomes, The underlying effects of the caregiver-child relationship quality on adolescent substance use in at-risk youth, The importance of fathers in social and behavioral development of children at-risk of maltreatment.

A. Vincent (PhD Student): Human- Animal Interaction

Accepted Poster Presentations:

Megan Holmes, PhD: Preschool-to-Kindergarten Transition: Promoting Resilient Prosocial behavior in Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

Elizabeth Tracy, PhD, Meeyoung Min, PhD, & Kathleen Farkas, PhD: Patterns of personal networks and their relationships to quality of life among women with substance abuse disorders.

Elizabeth Tracy, PhD Meeyoung Min, PhD: Patterns of personal networks and substance use among substance-using women.

Laura Voith, PhD: How Neighborhoods Influence Intimate Partner Violence: A Qualitative Inquiry with men in Batterer Intervention Programs.

L.H. Taylor, M.W. Francis (PhD Students), Meeyoung Min, PhD, & Elizabeth Tracy, Phd: Confirmatory factor analysis of an abbreviated abstinence self-efficacy measure: The Drug and Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy Scale.

E.J. Shon, JY Kim, D. Yoon, T. Olgac, M.W. Francis (PhD Students) & Meeyoung Min, PhD: Factor Structure of the urban hassles.

C. Chung (PhD Student): Predictors of Unmet Mental health Needs Among Young Adults with mental Illness in a U.S. nationally Representative Sample

K.A. Berg & M.W. Francis (PhD Students): “I don’t get no sleep”: Social work opportunities to improve sleep of children exposed to interpersonal violence.

The following alumni are also presenting at SSWR 2017:

  • Suzanne Brown, PhD 2012
  • Janet Hoy, MSSA 1999, PhD 2008
  • K.J. Ishler,
  • J.M. Kobulsky, PhD
  • Eun Lye Lee, PhD 2016
  • H. Park,
  • Susan Yoon, PhD 2016